Blog

Boosting Memory Power With Age

Exercising the brain throughout one's life is scientifically proving to preserve memory into older age.

Read Full Post »

Baby Boomers’ Health Worsens

If you’re a U.S. baby boomer, the odds are in your favor for longevity, but against you on good health.

Read Full Post »

Volunteering Lowers Blood Pressure

Besides the enjoyment of getting out and helping others, research shows that volunteerism can reduce the risk for hypertension, or high blood pressure, by up to 40 percent.

Read Full Post »

Seniors Can Visit National Parks on the Cheap

For just $10, seniors can purchase a lifetime access pass to more than 2,000 federal recreation sites, national parks and national wildlife refuges.

Read Full Post »

Spouse Caregivers in Sickness and In Health

These caregivers assist their spouses with medication management and many other medical/nursing tasks. The United Hospital Fund and AARP Public Policy Institute recently released a report showing that spouses who are caregivers not only perform many of the tasks that healthcare professionals d...

Read Full Post »

Spouse Caregivers Receive Less Help; Differences Between Home Care Agencies and Registries

These and other stories are in the July edition of the Caring Right at Home e-newsletter, providing information, advice and support for adult caregiving.

Read Full Post »

Take a Trip! You’ll Live Longer

Vacations are not only relaxing and exciting, they are actually proven to boost your health and lengthen your life.

Read Full Post »

Are Older Workers More Reliable Than Their Younger Colleagues?

Research shows that overall fluctuation in cognitive performance is lower in older adults compared to younger adults.

Read Full Post »

Exercise Your Brain After Retirement

We’ve long heard that physical fitness contributes to improved overall health, but scientists are now proving that your brain needs its own fitness program, especially if you are retired or over 65.

Read Full Post »

People With Dementia and Family Caregivers Need More Help

An estimated 5.4 million people in the United States have Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia, and 70 percent—most with mild to moderate dementia—are cared for in the community by family members and friends. Most people with dementia who live at home have multiple unmet...

Read Full Post »